Open Roaming Definition

by Tech Mainstream


May 3, 2019


Open Roaming Definition


The new connection technology, OpenRoaming is a "new way to connect your mobile devices to a Wi-Fi network – automatically. Say goodbye to finding and typing Wi-Fi passwords, and to disruptive pop-up screens you have to click through. With OpenRoaming, your mobile device can connect quickly, automatically, and securely to a trusted Wi-Fi network." The technology allows individuals to access wireless networks across enterprise, consumer, and public markets: "The Cisco-led federation includes several trusted identity providers, and allows users to join any network that is part of the federation."

Open Roaming has features similar to Passpoint, "some may recognize this kind of technology as similar to Passpoint, a method to streamline network access. Passpoint allows you to use your existing cellular device ID to access a Wi-Fi network. OpenRoaming allows enterprises and businesses to provide identity credentials in much the same way as cellular providers do Passpoint."

Open Roaming saves time and is more frustration free, "for example, if you’re in an airport trying to connect to Wi-Fi, you may have to look for the Wi-Fi network name (the SSID), wait for a pop-up on your device, and then accept terms and conditions. And this might happen multiple times while you’re in the airport. OpenRoaming eliminates that hassle. It creates a link between identity providers, service providers, and enterprises to safely share credentials and access networks."

Open Roaming offers a secure connection and also saves data by moving from LTE to Wi-Fi in places like airports, retail stores, arenas, etc.:

"Shoppers can automatically onboard to a retail store and receive notifications for discounts or assistance. Retailers can get back their data ownership, with the control and ability to edit, share, and restrict access to the data. Businesses can use OpenRoaming for enterprise guest access, which will allow easy collaboration across companies, and remove the finicky minutes of guest onboarding time."